Misc. Vespa 

4 Star Guided Vespa Tours

Tours are comprised of (14) people maximum per tour led by a local Italian Native PhD in Italian history. Every person has his or her own scooter to ride if they wish.

Self Guided Vespa Tour with Private Villa

These luxurious and newly restored 14th century private Villas come with your very own set of 2 Vespa scooters allowing you to be your own tour guide!
 

5 Star Ferrari Tour Guided

One of the joys of Italy by Ferrari is that your time is your own. Follow our guide driving your Ferrari through Tuscany. Would you enjoy a round of golf each day before setting out? Or a moonlit boat ride? Only your imagination can set the

As Italy's original and premier Vespa tour operator, Italy By Vespa offers luxury adventure scooter tours which have been ranked by Fortune Magazine. We are comprised of (14) people maximum per tour led by a vibrant Italian historian. Every person has his or her own scooter to ride if they wish. We have been guiding our luxury Vespa tours in Italy for the past 15 years, so contact us now to reserve your place for the week of your choice!Private Villa includes two 125cc Vespas. Additional third and fourth Vespas are €395.00 per week per scooter. Available for 2-Bedroom Villa only, not available for 1-Bedroom. Scooter upgades to 250cc is an available option.

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FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
 
November 17, 2005
I read your interesting article on scooters ["Born to Be Styled," Nov. 10], particularly the Vespa brand. For some reason, scooters are synonymous with Vespa. I have been riding a Vespa for the last 35 years and I own a 1973 model. My children grew up riding this vehicle and, well, they are in your wonderful country today. The vehicle is simple, easy to ride and maneuver in Bangalore's crazy traffic. It is easy to park and get about your work without hunting for parking places. Finally, from a mileage and mechanical point of view, it is very reliable.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
 
February 5, 2014 | By Charles Fleming
The scooter market is an increasingly crowded and competitive segment of the U.S. motorcycle business. Going after the urban commuter dollar are everything from inexpensive rides like the Kymco Like to high-powered freeway fliers like the Suzuki Burgman to super deluxe $10,000 models like the Vespa 946. Honda is splitting the difference and aiming for the middle of the target with its 2014 Forza. LANE-SPLITTING CONTROVERSY: Guidelines from the CHP   Sharing some genetic material with Honda's earlier Helix and Reflex scooter lines, the Forza is a sleek, smart-looking 300cc unit that features smooth power, a liquid-cooled and fuel-injected engine, an optional anti-lock ABS braking system and capacious storage.
 
 
 
BUSINESS
 
February 5, 2014 | By Charles Fleming
The scooter market is an increasingly crowded and competitive segment of the U.S. motorcycle business. Going after the urban commuter dollar are everything from inexpensive rides like the Kymco Like to high-powered freeway fliers like the Suzuki Burgman to super deluxe $10,000 models like the Vespa 946. Honda is splitting the difference and aiming for the middle of the target with its 2014 Forza. LANE-SPLITTING CONTROVERSY: Guidelines from the CHP   Sharing some genetic material with Honda's earlier Helix and Reflex scooter lines, the Forza is a sleek, smart-looking 300cc unit that features smooth power, a liquid-cooled and fuel-injected engine, an optional anti-lock ABS braking system and capacious storage.
BUSINESS
 
October 24, 2013 | By Charles Fleming
The legendary Italian motor-scooter company Piaggio has pulled the covers off the Vespa 946, its first all-new scooter model in six years. It could be an instant classic. Hand-built of welded steel and aluminum alloy in Piaggio's Pontedera factory, and "inspired by" the original MP6 Vespa prototype from 1946, this machine has classic Italian lines. The rear end looks like something off a vintage Bugatti. But this is no exercise in nostalgia. This is the first Vespa with ABS and electronic traction control.
 
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
 
September 28, 1987
A 55-year-old La Crescenta woman was charged with felony manslaughter Sunday after her car slammed head-on into an 18-year-old moped rider, immediately killing him, police said. Ian Grant, 18, of Burbank, was pronounced dead at the scene of the accident on La Tuna Canyon Road, east of Elben Avenue, in Sun Valley, said Los Angeles Police Officer Joe Klorman. Charged was Barbara A. Fell, a liquor store clerk.
MAGAZINE
 
August 13, 1995
"Rubber (and Canvas) Soul" (by Ed Leibowitz, July 9) was supposed to be an enlightening slice of Gen-X life. At 26, I, too, prowl around swap meets looking for fine examples of my favorite collectibles. I dye my hair strange colors, wear strange clothes and own my own business, restoring vintage Vespa motor scooters. Am I not interesting enough to merit four pages in your magazine? Or am I disqualified because I don't like corduroy Levi's, work a dead-end job and live with my mom? If you must portray the "twenty-something" crowd, try to find someone or something interesting.
OPINION
 
July 6, 2011
Not to Al Gore anybody's ox, but a lot of you Whole Foods hipsters think you're green because your Prius gets 50 mpg. My scooter gets 100. I just filled up my tank on the way to work. Total cost: $3.86, about the same price as a Starbucks grande Frappuccino but fueling an adrenaline buzz that will last a lot longer. Scooters, in fact, could save the world. You don't like the noise pollution from all those souped-up motorcycles tearing through L.A.? My scooter purrs like a kitten.
IMAGE
 
September 10, 2010 | By Daina Beth Solomon, Los Angeles Times
Varoom! There goes another candy-colored streamlined Vespa zooming through downtown Los Angeles — this one in a tangerine hue. Oh, and there's one in cherry red. And pastel blue. Did you see the mint-green one with the white daisy decals buzz by? Since it opened last November on the border between Little Tokyo and the Arts District, Vespa of Los Angeles has encouraged downtown residents to travel the city by scooter — and in style. The Vespa, which was originally manufactured in 1946 and means "wasp" in Italian, is an iconic European style symbol, seen all over the streets of major cities such as Paris and Milan.
NEWS
 
November 20, 2000 | BOOTH MOORE
With retro so popular these days for everything from clothes to cars (PT Cruiser and VW Bug), the makers of the Vespa motorbike are hoping to revive interest in the iconic Italian motorbike. The wasp-shaped Vespa (the Italian word for the insect), was developed in 1946 by designer Enrico Piaggio as an affordable mode of transportation.
BUSINESS
 
October 24, 2013 | By Charles Fleming
The legendary Italian motor-scooter company Piaggio has pulled the covers off the Vespa 946, its first all-new scooter model in six years. It could be an instant classic. Hand-built of welded steel and aluminum alloy in Piaggio's Pontedera factory, and "inspired by" the original MP6 Vespa prototype from 1946, this machine has classic Italian lines. The rear end looks like something off a vintage Bugatti. But this is no exercise in nostalgia. This is the first Vespa with ABS and electronic traction control.
BUSINESS
 
March 26, 2013 | By Charles Fleming
The last time I was in Rome I saw a young man in linen shorts and wraparound sunglasses, talking on a cellphone and smoking a cigarette while riding a Vespa, moving fast down a narrow street in the direction of the Piazza Navona. Perhaps only an Italian can do that, and only in the Eternal City, but there is something timelessly cool about the classic Italian scooter. As a motorcycle snob, I never rode a scooter -- or wanted to. Give me horsepower and performance, I said. Scooters are for ... amateurs.
OPINION

 

July 6, 2011
Not to Al Gore anybody's ox, but a lot of you Whole Foods hipsters think you're green because your Prius gets 50 mpg. My scooter gets 100. I just filled up my tank on the way to work. Total cost: $3.86, about the same price as a Starbucks grande Frappuccino but fueling an adrenaline buzz that will last a lot longer. Scooters, in fact, could save the world. You don't like the noise pollution from all those souped-up motorcycles tearing through L.A.? My scooter purrs like a kitten.
IMAGE

 

September 10, 2010 | By Daina Beth Solomon, Los Angeles Times
Varoom! There goes another candy-colored streamlined Vespa zooming through downtown Los Angeles — this one in a tangerine hue. Oh, and there's one in cherry red. And pastel blue. Did you see the mint-green one with the white daisy decals buzz by? Since it opened last November on the border between Little Tokyo and the Arts District, Vespa of Los Angeles has encouraged downtown residents to travel the city by scooter — and in style. The Vespa, which was originally manufactured in 1946 and means "wasp" in Italian, is an iconic European style symbol, seen all over the streets of major cities such as Paris and Milan.
NEWS

 

November 17, 2005
I read your interesting article on scooters ["Born to Be Styled," Nov. 10], particularly the Vespa brand. For some reason, scooters are synonymous with Vespa. I have been riding a Vespa for the last 35 years and I own a 1973 model. My children grew up riding this vehicle and, well, they are in your wonderful country today. The vehicle is simple, easy to ride and maneuver in Bangalore's crazy traffic. It is easy to park and get about your work without hunting for parking places. Finally, from a mileage and mechanical point of view, it is very reliable.
NEWS

 

September 18, 2002 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a recent morning, Gary Newman set off for work from his Studio City home on his chromed-out Vespa. He tucked his colorful tie into his sweater and strapped on his helmet. As he sped by a local golf course, men turned to watch. When he stopped, they crowded around like young boys to take a look. "You need a beautiful woman on the back," yelled one man. "With her hands in the air ... like this!"
NEWS

 

March 14, 2001 | JASON DIETRICH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ask anyone who's ever ridden one and they'll tell you it's all about the feeling of wind on your face, the hair-dryer whine of the engine and the road whizzing by under wheelbarrow-size tires. After a generation removed from the American market, the Vespa scooter, retooled and in eight candy-store colors from bright red to pastel green, is back. Italian manufacturer Piaggio pulled the line from North America in 1983, citing its inability to meet California's stringent air-quality regulations.
 
MAGAZINE

 

June 20, 1999 | Jason Dietrich
They putter playfully across IBM billboards high above the Sunset Strip. They pester SUV owners in Toyota commercials. Supermodels conspicuously straddle them in ads. While the Vespa motor scooter hasn't been sold Stateside since the early '80s, the plucky little two-wheeler is the advertising industry's new darling. "Open any issue of Vogue," says Derek Olry, owner of the Santa Ana shop Scooter Cafe, "and there'll be two or three scooters inside.
NEWS

 

November 20, 2000 | BOOTH MOORE
With retro so popular these days for everything from clothes to cars (PT Cruiser and VW Bug), the makers of the Vespa motorbike are hoping to revive interest in the iconic Italian motorbike. The wasp-shaped Vespa (the Italian word for the insect), was developed in 1946 by designer Enrico Piaggio as an affordable mode of transportation.

 

 
January 20, 1995 | ROSE APODACA JONES, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
They're not Harleys. And that suits enthusiasts like Brea Olinda High junior Ryan Parker who, as he says, "wouldn't get caught riding one of those things." A member of the latest generation of Vespa and Lambretta scooter riders, the 17-year-old favors the style of the Italian-made motorbikes. The Piaggio-designed Vespa hit the streets in 1936, with a pressed, one-piece metal frame hailed as a technical breakthrough at the time.
BUSINESS
 
February 6, 1996 | BRIAN MURPHY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
A recent movie depicts an Italian vision of the perfect morning: sun-bathed buildings, no traffic, trees in full bloom. And a Vespa with a full tank. Motorbikes are a key element in Italian life, providing not only cheap transport but lots of panache as well. The Vespa, the granddaddy of them all, turns 50 this year.
NEWS
 
March 14, 2001 | JASON DIETRICH, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ask anyone who's ever ridden one and they'll tell you it's all about the feeling of wind on your face, the hair-dryer whine of the engine and the road whizzing by under wheelbarrow-size tires. After a generation removed from the American market, the Vespa scooter, retooled and in eight candy-store colors from bright red to pastel green, is back. Italian manufacturer Piaggio pulled the line from North America in 1983, citing its inability to meet California's stringent air-quality regulations.
NEWS
 
September 18, 2002 | HILARY E. MacGREGOR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a recent morning, Gary Newman set off for work from his Studio City home on his chromed-out Vespa. He tucked his colorful tie into his sweater and strapped on his helmet. As he sped by a local golf course, men turned to watch. When he stopped, they crowded around like young boys to take a look. "You need a beautiful woman on the back," yelled one man. "With her hands in the air ... like this!"
NEWS
 
November 24, 1990 | MARILYN RASCHKA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Lebanese Vespa salesman is smiling. He has already sold six motor scooters, and it's only early afternoon. The snarled traffic in front of his shop is a delight to his eyes. His sales pitch is music to the ears of his customers: "On this scooter you can get from here to the other side in 15 minutes. Vespas hardly use any gas. And these fenders--if someone opens a car door and hits you, you won't be hurt."
BUSINESS
 
April 22, 2013 | By Charles Fleming
Gas prices are high at the pump and rising higher, and prospective motorcycle buyers -- especially first-time buyers -- often cite fuel efficiency as their No. 1 reason for wanting to swap four wheels for two. It's always a good swap, as far as mileage goes. Even the thirstiest gas-guzzling motorcycles get more miles per gallon than the most economical cars. Honda's road racing CBR1000RR gets a reported 41 mpg, for example, while a big beast like BMW's R1200GS gets close to 50 mpg. A powerful road bike like KTM's 1190 RC8 gets close to 40 mpg, as does a mid-range cruiser like the Moto Guzzi V7. But some motorcycles are really fuel efficient.
AUTOS
 
March 31, 2004 | DAN NEIL
Riding a motor scooter in Los Angeles is a religious experience. And that religion is Calvinism. You need a broadly fatalistic streak to ride a motorcycle in this city, where every day is like rush hour in Pamplona. Motor scooters -- the chic, Euro-style mini-motorcycles with the engine beneath the saddle and the step-through design -- are especially chancy. Being smaller and lower than motorcycles, scooters have less of a silhouette and are harder for drivers to see.
FOOD
 
August 5, 2010 | By S. Irene Virbila, Los Angeles Times Restaurant Critic
Pull up in front of the new Red O on Melrose and, before deigning to take your car, a valet in an embroidered guayabera and natty straw hat will lean into the window to ask, politely, if you've got a reservation. It's Mozza all over again. No reservation, no getting in. And on weekend nights, you'll need to reserve a month out. Even on the weekdays, it's the 6:30 or 9:30 routine. Try to get into the bar and the big guy posted outside the door, leaning on a lectern to make him look less like a bouncer, will nix that too. The bar is for patrons waiting for tables.
 
May 11, 1999 | LAURIE K. SCHENDEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Tattooed and leather-clad bikers can be an unnerving sight around a family restaurant. The Hollywood Rat Pack, however, invokes nothing more than smiles and friendly waves from strangers when it meets once a month at Barney's Beanery in West Hollywood. True, a dozen Vespas lined up along the curb aren't nearly as intimidating as a growling pack of Harley-Davidsons. We're talking "Roman Holiday" here, not "Easy Rider."
 

 

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HEALTH
 
September 13, 2012 | By Amber Dance, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The robot, sitting quietly in a corner, suddenly hums to life and rolls down the hospital corridor on three wheels. Perched atop the sleek machine is a monitor showing the smiling face of Dr. Paul Vespa, the physician who's piloting the rover from miles away. He can pull up to a patient's bedside, ask questions, observe symptoms and even use a stethoscope. "People forget that you're on the robot, and you forget that you're on the robot," says Vespa, a neurocritical care specialist at UCLA who uses the device to consult in other hospitals and check on UCLA patients from home.
MAGAZINE
 
July 15, 2001 | Mark Ehrman
Invited to: Vespa Fashion Extravaganza celebrating the reintroduction of the Italian company's iconic scooter, on Cosmo Street in Hollywood. * Leader of the pack: "It's a really nice summer night, and they've turned this street into a party place," says "American Beauty's" Thora Birch, arriving over a blacktop ramp to the blatter of engines and the beeping of horns. Of course, she's hearing piped-in sound effects. The real scooters are all silent and stationary.
BUSINESS
 
April 1, 2009 | Susan Carpenter
With few exceptions in modern motorbiking, the two-wheeled world has broken down something like this: Manual transmission equals motorcycle (and macho). Automatic transmission equals scooter (and sissy). But in the last year, the most caveman of two-wheeled categorizations has begun to evolve: Motorcycles are beginning to incorporate automatic transmissions. The Honda DN-01, which is rolling into U.S.
NEWS
 
September 22, 1985
Your article (Times, Sept. 15) on motor scooters said nothing about the danger of riding one. Your photo of Ms. Robbins riding without a helmet only proves that she may be economical but not wise. I am a middle-aged professional who rode, with great pleasure, a Vespa for almost five years. Six months ago I took a spill which resulted in broken ribs and severe contusions. Had I not had a helmet on I doubt that I would be writing this letter today. A scooter is fun and indeed economical.
NEWS
 
May 31, 1991 | ROSE APODACA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Memories of the freedom of youth, hot summer nights and the wind blowing through their hair have Southland motor scooter enthusiasts revving up their Vespas and Lambrettas and hitting the rally trail. About three dozen riders took to the streets in Costa Mesa last Sunday. The scooter brigade ended at Goodies Nightclub in Fullerton, which was hosting a 12-hour concert featuring Mod, ska and post-punk bands.
AUTOS
 
May 21, 2008 | SUSAN CARPENTER
Harley-Davidson might be wishing it made a scooter about now. In fact, most motorcycle manufacturers without one in their lineups have got to be feeling the pain. Motorcycle sales are down this year. Scooters, on the other hand, are selling as fast as their little wheels can carry them from showroom floors. Sales have jumped 23.6% in the first quarter of 2008 compared with the same period in 2007, and they're likely to continue their quick and upward trajectory.
AUTOS
 
July 9, 2008 | SUSAN CARPENTER
THE BUDDY may be the best Vespa knockoff on the market. That's saying something because so many scooters these days are attempting to emulate the famed Italian marque and style. The brand making the scooter: Genuine, which is funny for a bike that is so shamelessly trying to be something else. But genuine also describes the appreciation I have for this small company's "new vintage" model and the cult following its scooters have generated in the six years it's been in business.
The Vespa scooter was created in the 1940s. Because the Vespa has been around for so long, it may be difficult to find replacement parts for one. Try these tips to get parts for a Vespa.
 
Figure out which Vespa model you own. If you recently acquired a Vespa scooter without knowing much about it, then learning its model and whether it is vintage or modern can help you find the correct parts for it.
 
Check the official Vespa website for scooter images and part specifications. Choose a localized website from a list of countries and navigate through the site to get details on individual scooters.
  • If you need equipment such as a windshield or seat, the official website has these and other products available for purchase for certain scooter models.
     
    Search online for Vespa scooter dealers. They may be more likely to have parts for older, vintage scooters available for purchase. Two examples are Scooterworks and ScooterWest. Both companies sell modern and vintage Vespa parts on their websites.
    • If contacting a Vespa dealer to order parts by phone, you may need to provide them with your scooter's Vehicle Identification Number (VIN) to get more efficient service.
    • Vintage scooters are generally over 20 years old and have a body constructed of metal. They also have manual transmissions. Modern scooters generally have automatic transmissions and have become more fuel-efficient and reliable.
    • Your country's official Vespa website should also have a "Find a Dealer" section to help you locate dealers in your area.
    • Try taking your scooter to a local mechanic, auto or motorcycle repair shop. They may be able to help you find and identify which specific parts your Vespa needs.
      • Be aware that vintage scooter parts are becoming more difficult to find as fewer manufacturers produce them. Long waiting periods may occur before your parts are made and delivered to you.
      • If you live outside the European continent, prices for Vespa parts may change according to the currency exchange rate between Euros and your local currency. Most scooter parts are produced by European manufacturers.
        • Computer with Internet access
        • Phone book
        • Mechanic
        • Auto or motorcycle repair shop
        • Knowledge of Vespa model
        • Knowledge of Vespa parts
        • Vespa dealer
        • Online customer account
        • Credit card
        • Phone
        • Die Vespa PX wurde 1977 in Mailand in der nuova linea (neuen Linie) präsentiert, wobei auch die bewährte Technik verbessert wurde. Mit zwei Trommelbremsen, einem Einzylinder-Motor und einem Chassis aus Stahlblech setzt sie zwar die Tradition des Hauses fort, bekam aber eine komplett neue Vorderradaufhängung und eine überarbeitete Hinterradaufhängung für mehr Fahrstabilität. Zunächst wurde sie als Vespa P 125 X und als Vespa P 200 E mit einer elektronischen Zündung (E für Elettronica) vertrieben und 1978 auch als Vespa P 150 X, wobei diese Modelle ursprünglich als Vespa P bezeichnet wurden.

          Diese elektronische Zündung wurde 1981 im Rahmen der Modellpflege auch bei den neuen Modellen Vespa PX 125 und Vespa PX 150 E eingeführt. 1982 wird auch die Vespa P 200 E in Vespa PX 200 E umbenannt. Weitere Modellpflegemaßnahmen bringt 1983 die als Arcobaleno (und außerhalb Italiens als Lusso) bezeichnete Serie, wobei neben geringen optischen auch technische Neuerungen wie Getrenntschmierung und eine Tankanzeige eingeführt wurden. Seit 1981 wird die Vespa P 80 X (bzw. Vespa PX 80) angeboten. Die Modelle der Arcobaleno/Lusso-Serie gibt es wahlweise auch mit elektrischem Starter, was sich an Bezeichnungen wie Vespa PX 200 E Elestart verdeutlicht.

          Einen sportlichen Ableger gibt mit der Vespa 125 T5 Pole Position, deren Motor über fünf Überstromkanäle verfügt (daher der Name T5), wobei zugleich auch das äußere Erscheinungsbild geändert wurde. Der mit 12 PS sehr leistungsfähige T5-Motor wird ab 1992 auch in der Vespa PX 125 T5 Classic mit dem bekannten PX-Design angeboten.

           
           

          Vespa PX 200 Millennium (2003)

          In Italien wurde die Vespa PX zwischen 1988 und 1994 nicht vermarktet, auf Auslandsmärkten war sie aber weiterhin ein fixer Bestandteil. Zeitgleich mit Modellpflegemaßnahmen kam sie aber 1994 wieder ins inländische Angebot und zum 50. Jahrestag der Vespa wurde sie mit optischen Änderungen auch als Classic vermarktet. Mit einer gründlichen Überarbeitung zum 20-jährigen Modelljubiläum 1998 wurden vorne Scheibenbremse eingeführt, 1999 bekam sie einen ungeregelten  und 2001 wurden der Scheinwerfer, Rücklicht, Tacho, Kaskade und die Blinker modifiziert.

          Im Jahr 2008 wurde die Produktion eingestellt und die letzten Modelle als Ultima Serie in einer limitierten Auflage von 1000 Stück (mit Windschild, einem verchromten Gepäckträger hinten, Chromfelgen mit Weißwandreifen) verkauft. Dennoch kehrte die Vespa PX 2011 in fast unveränderter Form zurück: Einzig die mit 125 und 150 cm³ erhältlichen Motoren wurden an die für Neuzulassungen mittlerweile vorgeschriebene Abgasnorm angepasst. Hintergrund dieser Wiederauferstehung war wohl der große Erfolg des mit der PX baugleichen und nach Europa importierten Lizenzbaus des indischen Unternehmens  125").

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